About "Wildlife"

From polar bears to peregrine falcons, blue whales to bees, find out about Canada’s wildlife, habitats and conservation news.

Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna met with Canadian Geographic editor Aaron Kylie and other members of the Can Geo editorial team in January to brainstorm ideas for the November/December 2018 issue.

Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna met with Canadian Geographic editor Aaron Kylie and other members of the Can Geo editorial team in January to brainstorm ideas for the November/December 2018 issue. (Photo: Alexandra Pope/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Alexandra Pope/Canadian Geographic
Canadian Geographic will collaborate with McKenna on exclusive content for the November/December 2018 issue 
A Canada jay in flight with outstretched wings in southwestern B.C.

What’s in a name? Fans of the erstwhile grey jay have long wanted the bird’s name to once again reflect its connection to the north. (Photo: Ian Harland/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Ian Harland/Can Geo Photo Club
For decades, the gregarious bird of the northern forest was simply called the “grey jay.” Now, ornithologists are once again embracing the jay’s nationality. 
A scene of mountains, forest and glacial lake

Canada has pledged to protect 17 per cent of its land and freshwater by 2020, but has only achieved about 10 per cent of that target to date. A group of independent scientists hope their new framework will help identify priority areas for protection. (Photo: Laura Coristine)

Photo: Laura Coristine
As time runs out for Canada to meet its 2020 conservation targets, a new study aims to help governments and the public identify priority areas for protection
Three painted turtles sunning on a log

Groups of sunning painted turtles are a common sight around lakes and rivers in southern Ontario, but the species faces an uncertain future, according to biologists. (Photo: Alyx Luger/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Alyx Luger/Can Geo Photo Club
To save turtles, we need to think in “turtle time,” biologist says
Scientists from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration approach a young North Atlantic right whale entangled in fishing gear near Cape Canaveral. (NOAA Photo Library/flickr), CC BY-SA

Scientists from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration approach a young North Atlantic right whale entangled in fishing gear near Cape Canaveral. (Photo: NOAA Photo Library/flickr, CC BY-SA)

Photo: NOAA Photo Library/flickr, CC BY-SA
The death and entanglement of 17 of the endangered mammals last summer spurred an unprecedented effort to make the Gulf of St. Lawrence safer — but will it be enough? 
infographic of findings from BioBlitz Canada 150

An infographic showing a few key findings from BioBlitz Canada 150. (Infographic: Canadian Wildlife Federation)

Infographic: Canadian Wildlife Federation
35 events, 16,600 hours and 7,510 recorded species: the results are in from a series of bioblitz events held to commemorate Canada 150
Glass sponge reef in B.C.'s Hecate Strait

A glass sponge reef in B.C.'s Hecate Strait. Researchers have found that these mysterious, ancient animals evolved defensive behaviours to protect themselves from suffocation by excess sediment. (Photo: Sally Leys/CSSF/DFO)

Photo: Sally Leys/CSSF/DFO
New research reveals these unique animals evolved a way to rid their systems of excess sediment — but the sponges may be having trouble keeping up with human activity in their habitat
Common Eastern Bumblebee male foraging from Woodland Sunflower. Photo by Sheila Colla)

A common eastern bumblebee male foraging from a woodland sunflower. (Photo: Sheila Colla)

Photo: Sheila Colla
To save the bees, we first need to understand them—and recognize their value independent of their role as pollinators
A savannah sparrow

A new study has found that savannah sparrows near noisy sites are having a hard time communicating, in part due to stress. (Photo: Paulson Des Brisay)

Photo: Paulson Des Brisay
Study finds birds near noisy sites are stressed out and struggling to adapt
A boreal caribou cow nurses her calf in northeastern B.C.

A boreal woodland caribou cow nurses her calf in northeastern B.C. (Photo: Ryan Dickie/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Ryan Dickie/Can Geo Photo Club
Environmental groups frustrated by lack of action on the part of the provinces 
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