About "Wildlife"

From polar bears to peregrine falcons, blue whales to bees, find out about Canada’s wildlife, habitats and conservation news.

The North Atlantic right whale was the first large whale to be hunted commercially, the first to be protected internationally, and it will be the first to go extinct unless we prevent it. (Photo: Nick Hawkins)

Photo: Nick Hawkins
After a series of mass deaths in recent years, what can we do?

From bestselling author James Raffan comes an enlightening and original story about a polar bear’s precarious existence in the changing Arctic.

From bestselling author James Raffan comes an enlightening and original story about a polar bear’s precarious existence in the changing Arctic
Photo: Daisy Gilardini
Celebrating a springtime ritual of polar bear cubs emerging from the dens of Manitoba's famed Wapusk National Park

João Campos-Silva arrived in Amazonia 12 years ago and has since worked with local communities to protect the world’s largest scaled freshwater fish. (Photo: Marc Latzel)

Photo: Marc Latzel
By protecting local waterways, the arapaima’s population has already seen a 30-fold increase in the last 10 years

Frenchman River Valley. (Photo: Dana Reiter/Liber Ero)

Photo: Dana Reiter
Cattle grazing helps to conserve endangered grasslands as well as the habitat for many species at risk

The Reign of Wolf 21: The Sage of Yellowstone’s Legendary Druid Pack written by Rick McIntyre and published by Greystone Books in September, 2020.

Rick McIntyre explains the positive impact of wolf reintroduction on the Yellowstone ecosystem

This mountain lion photo is on the cover of our Wildlife Photography special edition. (Photo: Jeffrey Schrompf/Can Geo Photo Club)

How much do you know?
Amazon Rainforest Fire

Forest fires continue to rage in the Amazonian rainforest. (Photo: iStock)

Amazon Rainforest Fire
Bioethicist and conservationist Kerry Bowman on the 2020 Amazonian forest fires — as bad, or worse than 2019's — and why Canadians should be very concerned

Wildlife species, like the burrowing owl, are facing multiple threats. (Photo: Ray Hennessy/Unsplash)

Photo: Ray Hennessy/Unsplash
Report’s author says more needs to be done to stop a global extinction crisis

At one time, fewer than 25 whooping cranes remained in the wild. Now, thanks to efforts by the Calgary Zoo, there are now more than 800. (Photo: Valerie Horner/@valeriejoyhorner)

Photo: Valerie Horner
The Vancouver Island marmot, burrowing owl, greater sage-grouse and northern leopard frog are thriving again thanks to the zoo’s efforts 
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