About "Science & Technology"

The newest Canadian research and technological advances that are changing the way we understand and interact with our environment and each other.

Arctic Frontiers conference 2019

Aili Keskitalo, the president of the Sami Parliament of Norway, speaks at the "State of the Arctic" session at the Arctic Frontiers conference in Tromsø, Norway. (Photo: Terje Mortensen/Arctic Frontiers 2019)

Arctic Frontiers conference 2019
The uncertainty and change that's currently disrupting the region dominated the annual meeting's agenda
PEARL, North, Arctic, wildfire, spectrometer

Le dôme du spectromètre sur la toiture du Laboratoire Ridge de PEARL. Le dôme abrite le suiveur solaire, qui oriente la lumière à l’intérieur de la fenêtre d’entrée à travers un trou dans la toiture. (Photo : Erik Lutsch)

Photo : Erik Lutsch
Les relevés atmosphériques dans l’Extrême-Arctique canadien aident les scientifiques à comprendre comment les feux de forêt au sud influent sur la qualité de l’air et le climat
PEARL, North, Arctic, wildfire, spectrometer

The rooftop dome of the PEARL Ridge Lab spectrometer. The dome houses the solar-tracker, which guides light into the input window through a hole in the roof. (Photo: Erik Lutsch)

Photo: Erik Lutsch
Atmospheric readings in Canada’s High Arctic are helping scientists understand how southern wildfires are affecting air quality and climate
An amazing view of the full moon rising above a bed of clouds, as seen from the International Space Station

An amazing view of the full moon rising above a bed of clouds, as seen from the International Space Station. (Photo: NASA)

Photo: NASA
The federal government has announced a $2 billion investment in Canada’s space program, including a role in NASA’s Lunar Gateway project
CHARS, Canadian High Arctic Research Station, laboratories, Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, North

The new Canadian High Arctic Research Station’s laboratories are now being phased into operation. (Photo: Janice Lang/DRDC-DND)

Photo: Janice Lang/DRDC-DND
What does it take to operate high-tech scientific facilities — including live-study growing chambers and necropsy, genomics and imaging labs — in Canada’s Arctic?
CHARS, Canadian High Arctic Research Station, laboratories, Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, North

Les laboratoires de la nouvelle Station canadienne de recherche dans l’Extrême-Arctique sont en voie de mise en exploitation. (Photo : Janice Lang/RDDC-DND)

Photo : Janice Lang/DRDC-DND
Quels sont les éléments nécessaires pour exploiter les installations scientifiques de pointe, entre autres les chambres d’étude et d’autopsie, la génomique et les laboratoires d’imagerie, dans l’Arctique canadien? 
Volcanologists Steve Quane and Alex Wilson get ready to launch a drone to survey a volcanic dam

Volcanologists Steve Quane and Alex Wilson get ready to launch a drone to survey a volcanic dam in southwest B.C.’s Garibaldi Volcanic Belt. (Photo: Andrew Findlay)

Photo: Andrew Findlay
University of British Columbia PhD student Alex Wilson is studying the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt for clues to past climatic shifts
Jocelyn Joe-Strack, a geographer and scientist from the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations

Jocelyn Joe-Strack’s tour of Canadian embassies in Europe begins Feb. 12. (Photo: Allistair Maitland)

Photo: Allistair Maitland
Jocelyn Joe-Strack, a scientist and geographer from the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, is embarking on a tour of Canadian embassies in Europe to share Indigenous perspectives on climate change

A 2010 lunar eclipse, similar to the super moon expected tonight. (Photo: David Howard)

Photo: David Howard
There is only one total lunar eclipse to be seen in 2019, and it's set to colour the moon red tonight
Virtual water, hamburger, environment, beef

Billions of cubic metres of Canadian fresh water are poured into agricultural and industrial processes and products — like the ingredients in this hamburger — that are then shipped to different watersheds or countries. We’re losing more water than we're gaining, experts say. (Illustration: Kat Barqueiro/Can Geo)

Illustration: Kathryn Barqueiro/Can Geo
A massive amount of ‘virtual water’ is moving around regions and crossing borders in our food and other products
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