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The newest Canadian research and technological advances that are changing the way we understand and interact with our environment and each other.

Regenerative ocean farming works to mimic the diversity of ocean reefs by growing a mix of species that act in concert to revive ecosystems. (Photo: GreenWave)

Photo: GreenWave
Environmental benefits and food sources from this low-cost form of farming might be the future
Jameel Janjua Virgin Galactic pilot

Jameel Janjua to become the first Canadian commercial space pilot. (Photo: Courtesy Virgin Galactic)

Photo: Courtesy Virgin Galactic
Commercial space flight company Virgin Galactic adds former Royal Canadian Air Force member Jameel Janjua to its pilot roster 
Mount Logan

Mount Logan, Canada's highest mountain, in Kluane National Park and Reserve, Yukon. (Photo: Yukon Government)

Photo: Yukon Government
A team of climbers and scientists plan to summit the Yukon’s Mount Logan next spring in the name of climate change — and to re-evaluate its height with modern GPS technology

Warming permafrost causes what are called retrogressive thaw slumps—landslides caused by the melting of ground ice in the permafrost. (Photo: Rob Fraser/Canada Centre for Remote Sensing)

Photo: Rob Fraser/Canada Centre for Remote Sensing
From permafrost slumping to biodiversity inventories, here’s some of the most exciting research that PCSP supported in 2019

Mark J. Poznansky is the author of Saved By Science.

How can we accelerate the development of vaccines? How do we feed three billion people when 12 million died of hunger in 2019? Does synthetic biology hold the answer?
 Undersea drones are the newest whale protection tool

Exploring the Haughton Crater. (Photo: Gordon Osinski)

Our understanding of the effects of impact events is continually evolving

Professor and author Thomas Homer-Dixon examines how society can respond positively to the global climate crisis in his new book Commanding Hope. (Book: Courtesy of Penguin Random House Canada; Photo: Peter Lee)

Photo: Peter Lee
In an exclusive excperpt from his new book Commanding Hope, Thomas Homer-Dixon highlights four key stresses that inhibit society's collective sense of a promising future for our planet

The four members of the 1968-69 British Trans-Arctic Expedition. (Photo: BTAE)

Photo: BTAE
Ken Hedges of the 1968-69 British Trans Arctic Expedition reflects on the perilous and ground-breaking journey

The abundance and diversity of life on and around Canadian mountains in the sea. Starting in the dark and deep flanks (top left) and ascending above the summit to the sunlit sea surface (bottom right), the mosaic shows cold-water corals and glass sponges on pillows of lava, a variety of fishes, octopus, crabs, seaweeds, sharks, whales, and seabirds. (Photos: Fisheries and Oceans Canada, S. Du Preez, C. Du Preez, Ocean Exploration Trust, the Northeast Pacific Seamount Expedition partners, Pacific Wild)

Photos: Fisheries and Oceans Canada, S. Du Preez, C. Du Preez, Ocean Exploration Trust, the Northeast Pacific Seamount Expedition partners, Pacific Wild.
Two marine biologists offer a glimpse of life at the bottom of the ocean during 2018, 2019 and 2020 seamount expeditions 
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