About "Science & Technology"

The newest Canadian research and technological advances that are changing the way we understand and interact with our environment and each other.

A worker in a flightsuit makes adjustments to a satellite

An engineer at MDA Corporation in Montreal makes adjustments to one of three new satellites that will orbit Earth for seven years as part of the Canadian Space Agency’s newest RADARSAT mission. (Photo: Ossie Michelin/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Ossie Michelin/Canadian Geographic
The newest generation of the successful RADARSAT program will see three small satellites orbit Earth in tandem to provide detailed environmental data to Canadian researchers and government departments
PAV, personal aerial vehicle, flying vehicle

BlackFly has been in development secretly for the past nine years by OPENER, an aviation company founded in Warkworth, Ont. and now based in Palo Alto, California. (Photo: Courtesy OPENER)

Photo: Courtesy Opener
BlackFly requires no special skills to operate and can travel 115 kilometres per hour
Polar Knowledge Canada, Arctic, climate change, weather

Mobile research labs operating in the vicinity of Cambridge Bay, Nunavut. (Photo: Arctic Research Foundation)

Photo: Arctic Research Foundation
Innovative laboratories are adding new capabilities to climate research and communications in the western Arctic 
Polar Knowledge Canada, Arctic, climate change, weather

Des laboratoires de recherche mobiles exploités à proximité de Cambridge Bay (Nunavut). (Photo : Arctic Research Foundation)

Photo : Arctic Research Foundation
Les laboratoires novateurs ajoutent de nouvelles fonctionnalités à la recherche climatique et aux communications dans l’ouest de l’Arctique
More than 10,000 people visit the Canada-Wide Science Fair each year.

More than 10,000 people visit the Canada-Wide Science Fair each year. This year, 450 young finalists from across Canada presented more than 400 projects on topics related to information technology, health, energy, the environment and more. (Photo: Katherine Lissitsa/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Katherine Lissitsa/Canadian Geographic
These finalists in the 57th annual Canada-Wide Science Fair prove the future is in good hands
a 3D hologram of a person projected into a life-sized pod

A 3D hologram of a person is projected from one place to another using the TeleHuman2 videoconferencing system. (Photo: Queen's University Human Media Lab)

Photo: Queen's University Human Media Lab
A professor at Queen's University has developed new technology that transmits life-sized, 3D images of a person from one place to another
A cold and windy spring night on the vast landscape of Devon Ice Cap – two subglacial lakes are lurking 750 m below the surface. Photo credit: Anja Rutishauser

A cold and windy spring night on the vast landscape of the Devon Ice Cap, where two subglacial lakes were found to be lurking 750 metres below the surface. (Photo: Anja Rutishauser)

Photo: Anja Rutishauser
Conditions in isolated saline lakes beneath the Devon Ice Cap could be similar to those on Jupiter's icy moon Europa, thought to be capable of supporting life 
Canadian Geographic May/June 2018 issue

Option one, by Robin and Arlene Karpan, was the unanimous favourite of voters and staff for the cover of the May/June 2018 issue of Canadian Geographic.

Canadian Geographic May/June 2018 issue
Thanks to everyone who voted!
Google Earth Voyager Jill Heinerth Story

Google Earth Voyager follows the career of underwater explorer Jill Heinerth, with each panel taking the reader to different expedition locations. (Photo: Google Earth Voyager)

Photo: Google Earth Voyager
Canadian Geographic celebrates the exploration and conservation work of RCGS Explorer-in-Residence Jill Heinerth in a new Google Earth Voyager story
CSA astronaut David Saint-Jacques receives spacewalk training at NASA’s Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory in Houston.

Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques receives spacewalk training at NASA’s Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory in Houston. (Photo courtesy NASA/David DeHoyos)

Photo courtesy NASA/David DeHoyos
A conversation with Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques, who is getting ready to travel to the International Space Station later this year
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