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The newest Canadian research and technological advances that are changing the way we understand and interact with our environment and each other.

Arctic lichen

One example of the lichen POLAR researcher Ian Hogg monitors using probes and satellite images. (Photo: POLAR)

Photo: POLAR
With Canada’s North effectively closed, how are researchers changing their plans?

Three of the four members of the British Trans-Arctic Expedition (left to right): Roy 'Fritz' Koerner, glaciologist, Major Ken Hedges, Regimental Medical Officer, seconded from 22 Special Air Service, Allan Gill, navigator. Not pictured: Sir Wally Herbert, expedition leader. (Photo: Mick Rowsell)

Photo: Mick Rowsell
Dr. Ken Hedges, Honourary Colonel and RCGS Fellow, recounts his amazing experience traversing the top of the world on the expedition’s anniversary
Gatineau, Que. tornado Sept. 21, 2018

A tornado touches down in Gatineau, Que. on Sept. 21, 2018. (Photo: Alexandra Pope/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Alexandra Pope/Canadian Geographic
Physical distancing requirements to slow the spread of COVID-19 will make it difficult for researchers to visit suspected tornado sites this year, so the team behind the Northern Tornadoes Project is calling on the public to help 

A photo of elegant sunburst lichen (Xanthoria elegans), an example of a specimen in the collection that citizen scientists may encounter on Expedition Arctic Botany. This lichen is an iconic Arctic plant species, but can also be found across Canada. (Photo courtesy Jennifer Doubt)

Photo courtesy Jennifer Doubt
Expedition Arctic Botany will allow curious members of the public to explore the plants of the Arctic region without leaving home, while contributing to our understanding of Arctic ecosystems
Boreal wetland Algonquin Provincial Park

Boreal peatlands are home to a wide range of species, including many nationally and globally rare plants and lichens. (Photo: Nina Stavlund/Can Geo Photo Club)

(Photo: Nina Stavlund/Can Geo Photo Club)
A huge part of Canada's northern geography, peatlands are critical to regulating our climate — and more

Isotopic data shows large herbivores may have co-existed in the same habitats. (Illustration: Luke Dickey/Western University)

Illustration: Luke Dickey/Western University
What dinosaurs lived in close proximity to each other — and why? New research uses dinosaur teeth to find the answers
Wildlife Enforcement Directorate Office

Senior wildlife officer Andrew Bruce holds an elephant tusk in Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Wildlife Enforcement Directorate evidence room in Burlington, Ont. The international trade in wildlife is believed to be a major contributing factor in the emergence of new pathogens like the novel coronavirus. (Photo: Peter Power/Can Geo)

(Photo: Peter Power/Can Geo)
The SARS outbreak of 2003 showed us the consequences of environmental degradation and the commodification of wild animals. Why hasn’t anything changed? 
The New York Times COVID-19 map

Canadian Geographic cartographer Chris Brackley says this COVID-19 case map by The New York Times may be an ideal balance of density and intensity in accurately charting the pandemic in the United States. (Map: The New York Times)

Map: The New York Times
Canadian Geographic cartographer Chris Brackley continues his exploration of how the world is charting the COVID-19 pandemic, this time looking at how artistic choices inform our reactions to different maps

J32, known as Rhapsody, was an 18-year old female in a pod of whales in the North Pacific Ocean.

When one of the few remaining females of reproductive age in the southern resident population of North Pacific killer whales was found dead near Comox B.C. in 2014, an investigation was launched. The results highlight the challenges of protecting our most iconic marine mammals.

This map shows the per capita number of cases of COVID-19 in Canada by regional health authority. (Map: Chris Brackley/Can Geo)

Map: Chris Brackley/Can Geo
Canadian Geographic cartographer Chris Brackley continues his exploration of charting the coronavirus pandemic 
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