About "People & Culture"

The people and ideas shaping the way we think about our natural and human-made spaces, design, art and photography and more in Canada

Canadian Geographic, la Société géographique royale du Canada et le conseil de recyclage de l’Ontario se sont unis pour imaginer la prochaine étape de la révolution Réduire, Réutiliser, Recycler : l’initiative 10 000 changements
former archaeological site is now inundated at high tide. The rich artifact-bearing soil has been washed away, and with it all the Indigenous pot fragments, stone tools, animal bones, and cultural features. Only a few flakes from making stone tools remained scattered amongst the boulders.

A former archaeological site in Nova Scotia is now inundated at high tide. The rich artifact-bearing soil has been washed away, and with it all the Indigenous pot fragments, stone tools, animal bones, and cultural features it once contained. Only a few flakes from making stone tools remained scattered amongst the boulders. (Photo: Matthew Betts)

Photo: Matthew Betts
As sea level rise and the accelerating pace of coastal erosion threaten cultural heritage around the world, Canada has a lot to lose
Greg Nolan Williston Lake BC

Greg Nolan (left) huddles under a makeshift tent on the remote west side of Williston Lake in northern British Columbia. The image was taken in June 1984, shortly after Nolan and his colleagues were stranded on the mountainside by their helicopter pilot after access had been cut off by a landslide. (Photo: Greg Nolan)

Photo: Greg Nolan
In his new book, Highballer: True Tales from a Treeplanting Life, Greg Nolan recounts his rollicking, rewarding and often risky career as a tree planter in British Columbia and Alberta. 
Le Musée de Saint-Boniface Museum

A bust of Louis Riel sits outside Le Musée de Saint-Boniface Museum in the Winnipeg neighbourhood of Saint Boniface. (Photo: Cal Hills)

Photo: Cal Hills
One writer’s journey to explore the life of Louis Riel
Assassin's Creed Odyssey landscape

A scene from the made-in-Canada video game Assassin's Creed Oydssey, which showcases the detail with which the landscape was recreated using real-world maps. (Image: Ubisoft Québec)

Image: Ubisoft Québec
Maps have long played a critical role in video games, whether as the main user interface, a reference guide, or both. As games become more sophisticated, so too does the cartography that underpins them. 
Dr. Andrea McCrady smiles in front of the Peace Tower on Parliament Hill

Dr. Andrea McCrady near the Peace Tower on Parliament Hill, where she’ll continue her role as dominion carillonneur amid extensive renovations. (Photo: Ben Powless/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Ben Powless/Canadian Geographic
Canada’s dominion carillonneur, Dr. Andrea McCrady, on making sure the bells of the Peace Tower continue to ring during the decade-long renovation of Parliament’s Centre Block
A female scuba diver holds a light up to anemones during a night dive

2019 North American Rolex Scholar Neha Acharya-Patel, the first Canadian to hold the scholarship, dives at night near Catalina Island off the coast of California while working with the Pennington Marine Science Center. (Photo: Shaun Wolfe)

Photo: Shaun Wolfe
Meet Neha Acharya-Patel, the first Canadian recipient of the prestigious Rolex scholarship from the Our World Underwater Scholarship Society
Two people watch a video at the UNCEDED exhibit

Guests watch one of the multimedia presentations as part of UNCEDED: Voices of the Land. (Photo: Dexter McMillan/Can Geo)

Photo: Dexter McMillan/Can Geo
UNCEDED: Voices of the Land features 18 of North America’s foremost Indigenous architects and designers
The lizard-inspired Canadian innovation that pulls drinking water out of thin air

A rendering of AWN Nanotech’s atmospheric water generator (left), which harnesses a water-condensing material that biomimics the abilities of species such as thorny devil lizards (right). (Photos: AWN Nanotech; Bäras/Wikimedia Commons)

Photos: (left) AWN Nanotech; (right) Bäras/Wikimedia Commons
And it was inspired by a lizard
Simon Jackson of Ghost Bear Institute and Spirit Bear Youth Coalition

Simon Jackson in 2018. When he was 13, Jackson founded the Spirit Bear Youth Coalition to raise global awareness of the rare bear and threats to its rainforest home. (Photo: Jill Cooper)

Photo: Jill Cooper
A new children’s book from Kids Can Press tells the story of Vancouver native Simon Jackson’s efforts to raise global awareness of the importance of British Columbia’s Great Bear Rainforest
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