About "People & Culture"

The people and ideas shaping the way we think about our natural and human-made spaces, design, art and photography and more in Canada

women on a bridge looking into a forest

The Nature Conservancy of Canada's ongoing panel discussions explore our complicated relationship with nature. (Photo: Pixabay)

Photo: Pixabay
Experts tackle our difficult relationship with nature in panel discussions hosted by Nature Conservancy of Canada 
A closeup of the Snuxyaltwa pole at the ancient village of Talyu, in B.C.'s Bella Coola Valley

A detail of the Snuxyaltwa totem pole at the ancient village site of Talyu on South Bentinck Arm near Bella Coola, B.C. The pole was raised in 2009 by the Snow family, former residents of Talyu who were evicted in the 1930s, as a way of reclaiming their hereditary right to the place
. (Photo: Julian Brave NoiseCat/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Julian Brave NoiseCat/Canadian Geographic
In British Columbia’s Bella Coola Valley, the next generation of Nuxalk culture-keepers and Guardian Watchmen is establishing a new paradigm for Indigenous rights
Douglas Coupland vortex Vancouver Aquarium ocean plastic Haida Gwaii

Artist and author Douglas Coupland stands in the midst of Vortex, his radical new art installation about ocean plastic on now at the Vancouver Aquarium. (Photo: Ocean Wise)

Photo: Ocean Wise
The renowned Canadian artist and bestselling author discusses how his love of plastic morphed into an art exhibit about ocean pollution
Ylva and Hilde Østby, and the cover of the their new book, Adventures in Memory

In their new book “Adventures in Memory: The Science and Secrets of Remembering and Forgetting,” sisters Ylva and Hilde Østby explore the rich but elusive terrain of human memory and its connection to place. (Author photo: Anna-Julia Granberg; cover image courtesy Greystone Books)

Author photo: Anna-Julia Granberg; cover image courtesy Greystone Books
In their new book, Adventures in Memory: The Science and Secrets of Remembering and Forgetting, Norwegian sisters Hilde and Ylva Østby explore what makes our most fascinating faculty tick
Royal Alberta Museum, move,

Ken Romanyshyn moves a carefully packaged model ofa giant bison onto a truck at the Royal Alberta Museum's old building.

Amber Bracken
The Royal Alberta Museum officially opens its new dowtown Edmonton building today, capping a complex multi-year move that’s captured in this behind-the-scenes photo essay
2019 Indspire award winners group photo

The 2019 Indspire award winners (left to right): Kelly Fraser, Peter Dinsdale, Barbara Hager, Brigette Lacquette, James Lavallée, Dr. Marlyn Cook, Speaker of the House of Commons Geoff Regan (back), Atuat Akittirq (front), Grand Chief Ronald Derrickson, Jijuu Mary Snowshoe, Billy-Ray Belcourt, Dianne Corbiere and Vianne Timmons. (Photo: Courtesy Indspire)

Photo: Courtesy Indspire
Twelve Indigenous people honoured for their extraordinary work across Canada

Jonny Harris brings jokes to small towns across Canada with his CBC show, Still Standing. (Photo: Chris Armstrong/Frantic Films, courtesy of CBC)

Photo: Chris Armstrong/Frantic Films, courtesy of CBC
Comedian Jonny Harris, of Still Standing fame, on finding inspiration from coast to coast to coast

Left: The poster for new documentary “That Never Happened.” Right: Director Ryan Boyko. (Photos courtesy Armistice Films)

Photos courtesy Armistice Films
Between 1914 and 1920, some 5,000 ethnic Ukrainians were imprisoned in Canadian internment camps. A new documentary tells their stories. 

Trans-Canada Trail board chair Neil Yeates and Minister responsible for Parks Canada Catherine McKenna hold a Great Trail flag while Parks Canada CEO Daniel Watson (standing, right) and Michael Nadler, Parks Canada's vice president of external relations and visitor experience, look on. (Photo courtesy Parks Canada)

Photo courtesy Parks Canada
Network of connected trails that spans Canada from coast to coast to coast will receive cash over a four-year period
Gidin Jaad Erica Jean Ryan, right, runs through lines with an actor in Sgaawaay K’uuna, The Edge of the Knife, a Haida-language film that premieres next week at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Gidin Jaad Erica Jean Ryan, right, runs through lines with an actor in Sgaawaay K’uuna, The Edge of the Knife, a Haida-language film that premieres next week at the Toronto International Film Festival. (Photo courtesy Haida Laas/Graham Richard)

Photo courtesy Haida Laas/Graham Richard
“The more I learn, the more I realize that it’s my responsibility to teach”
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