About "The North"

The people, places, events and latest research of Canada’s subarctic and Arctic regions, one of the fastest-changing environments on Earth

Snow geese in flight

Dans les dernières décennies, le nombre d’oies des neiges qui se reproduisent dans l’Arctique a explosé. (Photo: Christina McCallum/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Christina McCallum/Can Geo Photo Club
Des experts inuits et des scientifiques d’Environnement Canada collaborent pour gérer une explosion démographique de l’oie des neiges
Natan Obed, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami

Natan Obed is president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the national organization that advocates for the people of Inuit Nunangat and works to Inuit language and culture. (Photo: ITK/Adam Scotti)

Photo: ITK/Adam Scotti
Natan Obed, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, on the idea of a Inuit-Crown relationship, Canada’s Inuit homelands and the role of Inuit in the world
climate change landscapes across canada

The effects of climate change can already be observed across the country, and will only become more apparent as the planet continues to warm.

From floods to fires, drought to coastal erosion, climate change is already having an impact on Canada's communities, landscapes and wildlife
Dean Hadley, centre, was the youngest crew member aboard the RCMPV St. Roch when schooner sailed through the Northwest Passage in the early 1940s. (Photo: VMM. Leonard McCann Archives. Parks Canada St. Roch Photograph Collection. HCSR-40-18. 1942 crew in uniform.)

Dean Hadley, centre, was the youngest crew member aboard the RCMPV St. Roch when the schooner sailed through the Northwest Passage in the early 1940s. (Photo: VMM. Leonard McCann Archives. Parks Canada St. Roch Photograph Collection. HCSR-40-18. 1942 crew in uniform.)

Photo: VMM. Leonard McCann Archives. Parks Canada St. Roch Photograph Collection. HCSR-40-18. 1942 crew in uniform.
Dean Hadley was the youngest member of the crew that first navigated the Northwest Passage west to east in 1940. He passed away last Friday at the age of 98.
A glacier landscape on northern Ellesmere Island

On northern Ellesmere Island, warming land and sea temperatures have caused glacier melt to accelerate, according to new research. (Photo: Luke Copland)

Photo: Luke Copland
A study of more than 1,700 glaciers on northern Ellesmere Island found six per cent of ice coverage disappeared between 1999 and 2015
Amundsen Gjoa 1903 Northwest Passage Inuit

Part of the Gjøa’s crew — Gustav Juel Wiik, Roald Amundsen, Peder Ristvedt and Anton Lund — on deck in the Northwest Passage. (Courtesy Fram Museum)

Courtesy Fram Museum
A foremost Amundsen expert shares some highlights from famed Norwegian explorer’s 1903-06 expedition to the North Pole 
Conor and Kim Mihell in Nunavik

Conor and Kim Mihell on Rivière Guerin in August 2016 during a previous canoe expedition in Nunavik, Que. (Photo: Conor Mihell)

Conor and Kim Mihell in Nunavik
We aim to experience and share the vast, little-publicized wilderness of Nunavik, formerly known as Ungava
Guests at a launch event for the RCGS summer exhibit series

Guests mingle inside “Explore,” an exhibition of paintings by Chris Cran that is part of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society’s 2018 Summer Exhibits series at 50 Sussex. (Photo: Ben Powless/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Ben Powless/Canadian Geographic
Summer series features three exhibitions: Compass by Hilde Lambrechts, Explore by Chris Cran, and Lessons from the Arctic, an artifact display honouring Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen
Polar bear and cub on green tundra

An aerial survey of southern Hudson Bay has found that the previously stable polar bear population is now in decline, with fewer cubs surviving their first year. (Photo: Martyn Obbard)

Photo: Martyn Obbard
The number of polar bears living around southern Hudson Bay has dropped by nearly a fifth since 2011
Polar Knowledge Canada, Arctic, climate change, weather

Mobile research labs operating in the vicinity of Cambridge Bay, Nunavut. (Photo: Arctic Research Foundation)

Photo: Arctic Research Foundation
Innovative laboratories are adding new capabilities to climate research and communications in the western Arctic 
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