About "The North"

The people, places, events and latest research of Canada’s subarctic and Arctic regions, one of the fastest-changing environments on Earth

September/October, cover vote, Tombstone mountain
Photo: Julien Schroder
The voters have spoken! (And we agree.)
A view of the shoreline in Tuktoyaktuk, N.W.T.

Tuktoyaktuk, N.W.T., is crumbling into the Arctic Ocean due to climate change-related coastal erosion. (Photo: Adam Jones/CC by-SA 3.0)

Photo: Adam Jones [CC by-SA 3.0]
The strategy calls for a coordinated climate policy in Inuit Nunangat and will receive $1-million from the federal government
A large blue iceberg floats in the Arctic Ocean

Photo: Sasha Latchaev/Can Geo Photo Club

Photo: Sasha Latchaev/Can Geo Photo Club
Arctic expert and legal scholar Michael Byers weighs in on how Canada can take the lead on northern issues
a collage of wildlife photos including bison, grizzly bears, polar bears, foxes, owls and whales

Some of the best wildlife images from the new Ultimate Canadian Instagram Photos special issue, on newsstands now. (Clockwise from top left: @shane_turgeon, @daisygilardini, @divebuddies4life, @nicole_handspiker, @benaroundandback, @andreaudet, @mirelaofearth, @javiers_wonderplanet, @jkr_photo, @focused_on_canada)

Clockwise from top left: @shane_turgeon, @daisygilardini, @divebuddies4life, @nicole_handspiker, @benaroundandback, @andreaudet, @mirelaofearth, @javiers_wonderplanet, @jkr_photo, @focused_on_canada
Grizzlies, puffins, whales and more from the new Ultimate Canadian Instagram Photos special issue, on newsstands now
Bart Hanna with Sedna sculpture

Inuit artist Bart Hanna (in yellow tie) talks about his sculpture Sedna, which he unveiled during a ceremony on Parliament Hill on April 8, 2019, as part of the celebrations marking the 20th anniversary of Nunavut becoming a territory. (Photo: House of Commons)

Bart Hanna with Sedna sculpture
An interview with Inuit artist Bart Hanna, whose sculpture of the Inuit sea goddess has been unveiled on Parliament Hill as part of the celebrations marking the 20th anniversary of Nunavut becoming a territory
Upper Wind River

A stretch of the upper Wind River, at the northern reach of the Mackenzie Mountains. David McGuffin, Graham McGuffin and Terry Camsell paddled this route during their voyage through the Peel River watershed. (Photo: David McGuffin)

Photo: David McGuffin
We came to retrace an ancestor’s 1905 map-making expedition of the Peel River watershed. We left with a new-found appreciation of what this ancient land means to the people who live there. 
Coniferous trees lean at different angles in the snow

Thawing permafrost causes trees to lean, a phenomenon called a "drunken forest." (Photo: Mady Macdonald/Dreamstime.com)

Photo: Mady Macdonald/Dreamstime.com
Permafrost thaw is widespread, accelerating and irreversible. With it comes visible effects on the ecology, hydrology and landscapes, and communities of the North.
a collage of images of Nunavut, including an Inuit child, Aaju Peter, a polar bear, the community of Pond Inlet, Lamech Kadloo, the community of Kugluktuk, ice

Clockwise from bottom left: A common murre takes flight in the Northwest Passage; ice in the Northwest Passage; a young boy in Cape Dorset; the community of Pond Inlet, on northern Baffin Island; Lamech Kadloo gives a traditional drum performance in Pond Inlet; the road to Kugluktuk; Aaju Peter in Iqaluit; a polar bear on Sentry Island, west of Arviat. (Photos: Michelle Valberg)

Photos: Michelle Valberg
Reflecting on 20 years of Canada's newest territory, Nunavut
Floe edge polar bear, Nunavut

A polar bear on the sea ice close to the floe edge at Button Point, on the southeast corner of Bylot Island, Nunavut. (Photo: Françoise Gervais/Arctic Kingdom)

Photo: Françoise Gervais/Arctic Kingdom
Welcome to the sinaaq, or floe edge, where landfast ice meets open Arctic Ocean and species thrive
A person in a space suit and helmet stands in front of a rocky, dry landscape on Devon Island

Devon Island in the Canadian High Arctic is the largest uninhabited island on Earth and the most Mars-like environment on our planet, which is why NASA has chosen it as a base for its research and planning for a future mission to the red planet.
(Photo: Google)

Photo courtesy Google
A new Google project zeroes in on Canada’s Devon Island, the most Mars-like environment on Earth
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