About "Mapping"

Creative and accurate cartography that illustrates Canada’s landscapes and geology, wildlife routes, communities, history, changing boundaries and more.

1768 map showing River Exploits flowing into Lieutenant's Lake, showing Beothuk mamateeks, deer fences and scarecrows.

John Cartwright didn't encounter any Beothuk when he set out to record this map, but he did observe their summer dwellings and hunting infrastructure.(Map: John Cartwright 1768/Library and Archives Canada)

Map: John Cartwright 1768/Library and Archives Canada
This map, “taken on the spot in the year 1768,” tells but a tiny piece of the story of Newfoundland’s bygone Beothuk
Howe Sound: Erik Ringsmuth

A view of Howe Sound from the top of the Squamish Chief. (Photo: Erik Ringsmuth)

Howe Sound: Photo by Erik Ringsmuth
The 400-layer map will connect communities, celebrate culture and share data to protect the Howe Sound ecosystem
Four Canadian map entries have been recognized by the Cartography and Geographic Information Society in the 2020 Map Design Competition

Map credit: Mamu Tshishkutamashutau/Innu Education

A 2nd edition of a hand-painted Innu map is set to be printed as demand around the country grows

Map: Chris Brackley

Land cover change maps can help us determine our impact on the land — and how we can mitigate it in the future

Map: Associate Professor Federico Maggi, Dr Fiona Tang, University of Sydney

Map: Associate Professor Federico Maggi, Dr Fiona Tang, University of Sydney
Asia and Europe revealed as having regions at high-risk of pesticide pollution
Everest by sunrise

Everest's North Face in evening light, with the Northeast Ridge climbing up the left-hand side. (Photo: Ralf Dujmovits)

Photo: Ralf Dujmovits
A century after a Canadian was instrumental in charting the world's highest peak, a fellow Canadian reflects on the magnetism of Everest

Map: Jennifer Johnston

Charting “Hope Spots” critical to the health of our planet’s oceans

Mangroves, like these in Madagascar, provide a range of benefits, including protection from storms and the prevention of coastal erosion. (Louise Jasper/Blue Ventures)

Mangroves provide a range of benefits, including protection from storms and the prevention of coastal erosion
Canadian Geographic Best Maps 2020
Cartographic highlights from Canadian Geographic’s 2020 issues
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