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From Canada’s early First Nations and Inuit cultures to European exploration, Confederation, women’s suffrage, wartime and beyond.

Map of Segezha, northwestern Russia

A map used to plan a surprise attack led by Canadians on Segezha, a village in northwestern Russia in February 1919. (Map credit: Proposed Operation at Segezha by Major Drake-Brockman, 1919-1920, John Edwards Leckie fonds, Library and Archives Canada, e011202552)

How Canadians went from fighting Germans in Europe to battling Bolsheviks in Russia after the First World War
Following an extensive renovation, the old downtown Ottawa train station has re-opened as the temporary home of the Senate of Canada. (Photo courtesy Senate of Canada)

Following an extensive renovation, the old downtown Ottawa train station has re-opened as the temporary home of the Senate of Canada. (Photo courtesy Senate of Canada)

Photo courtesy Senate of Canada
Inside the transformation of the old Ottawa train station into the “Red Chamber on Rideau”
Hebron Mission Station 1906 with Harmony ship in background

A view of Hebron mission station in 1906 with the supply ship Harmony (No. 5) visible in the bay. The Harmony brought Spanish influenza to Labrador in 1918. (Photo: Hebron, Bucht mit Eisschollen und Harmony 1906 by Bohlmann, Ernst, 1864-1945. Archives and Special Collections, Memorial University of Newfoundland)

Archives and Special Collections, Memorial University of Newfoundland
An excerpt from We All Expected to Die: Spanish Influenza in Labrador, 1918-1919
A tribute placed at the Vimy Memorial

A remembrance tribute placed at the foot of the Canadian National Vimy Memorial in France ahead of this month’s centennial commemorations of the Armistice that ended the First World War. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

Photo: Stephen Smith/Canadian Geographic
Now that a century has passed since the end of the First World War, is it inevitable that efforts to remember the events of the war will start to fade?
St. Symphorien Cemetery, east of Mons, was established by the German Army in 1914 after the opening salvoes of the First World War. Private John Parr, the first British soldier to be killed on the Western Front, is buried here. So too is Private George Price, from Falmouth, Nova Scotia, who’s recognized as the last soldier of the British Empire to die in the First World War — at 10:58 on the morning of November 11, 1918. St. Symphorien contains the graves of 284 German soldiers along with 227 British, and t

St. Symphorien Cemetery, east of Mons, was established by the German Army in 1914 after the opening salvoes of the First World War. Private John Parr, the first British soldier to be killed on the Western Front, is buried here. So too is Private George Price, from Falmouth, Nova Scotia, who’s recognized as the last soldier of the British Empire to die in the First World War — at 10:58 on the morning of November 11, 1918. St. Symphorien contains the graves of 284 German soldiers along with 227 British, and two Canadians. (Photo: Stephen Smith)

Photo: Stephen Smith
Roaming First World War sites and cemeteries in northern France and Belgium, Stephen Smith reflects on what time heals — and what it can’t 
Vimy centennial park aerial view vimy national historic site

Situated adjacent to the Canadian National Vimy Memorial, the Vimy Foundation Centennial Park is intended to be a space for reflection and discussion on the legacy of the decisive First World War battle. (Photo: Pascal Brunet/Vimy Foundation)

Photo: Pascal Brunet/Vimy Foundation
The Vimy Foundation Centennial Park provides a home for 100 repatriated ‘Vimy Oaks’ and is intended to be a space for reflection on the decisive battle
Ex Coelis mountain Alberta

Ex Coelis, the Latin motto of the First Canadian Parachute Battalion, translates as “Out of the clouds.” Members of the battalion were among the first Allied forces on the ground during the D-Day landings. Many were taken prisoner. Alberta’s Ex Coelis mountain, pictured, has five peaks, each named in honour of the battalion. (Photo: Jeff Wallace/Flickr)

Photo: Jeff Wallace/Flickr
An interactive mapping project compiles the nation’s geographic memorials to Canada’s role in global conflicts
Lady Franklin, Sir John Franklin, London, Arctic, explorer, Erebus, Terror

Erika Behrisch Elce’s new book develops the character of the famously private Lady Franklin through imagined letters to her explorer husband, written around the time of his untimely Arctic death. (Images, clockwise from left: Stonehouse Publishing; Amelie Romilly, 1815/public domain; National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London)

Images, clockwise from left: Stonehouse Publishing; Amelie Romilly, 1815/public domain; National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London
A new novel by Erika Behrisch Elce brings Lady Franklin — widow of doomed polar explorer Sir John Franklin — to life in new and creative ways
Defying Limits, by astronaut Dave Williams

Photos courtesy Simon & Schuster Canada (left) and NASA.

Photos courtesy Simon & Schuster Canada (left) and NASA
A new memoir that unpacks the life of one of Canada’s most accomplished astronauts, who’s also an aquanaut, doctor, CEO and cancer survivor 
Michael Palin
Michael Palin speaks about his new book, a history of the polar exploration vessel HMS Erebus, at The Royal Canadian Geographical Society's new headquarters at 50 Sussex Dr. in Ottawa on Oct. 19, 2018. (Photo: Ben Powless/Can Geo)
Michael Palin at 50 Sussex (Photo: Ben Powless)
The author, actor and member of Monty Python wrapped up the Canadian leg of his North American book tour with a sold-out show in Ottawa  
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