About "Exploration"

Follow Canada’s greatest explorers and adventurers as they travel to the remote corners of the country, deep beneath the Earth’s surface and across oceans, to the tops of mountains and into space.

The abundance and diversity of life on and around Canadian mountains in the sea. Starting in the dark and deep flanks (top left) and ascending above the summit to the sunlit sea surface (bottom right), the mosaic shows cold-water corals and glass sponges on pillows of lava, a variety of fishes, octopus, crabs, seaweeds, sharks, whales, and seabirds. (Photos: Fisheries and Oceans Canada, S. Du Preez, C. Du Preez, Ocean Exploration Trust, the Northeast Pacific Seamount Expedition partners, Pacific Wild)

Photos: Fisheries and Oceans Canada, S. Du Preez, C. Du Preez, Ocean Exploration Trust, the Northeast Pacific Seamount Expedition partners, Pacific Wild.
Two marine biologists offer a glimpse of life at the bottom of the ocean during 2018, 2019 and 2020 seamount expeditions 

A grizzly bear in Bute Inlet, B.C. (Photo: Homalco Tours/Tyler Cave/Destination Campbell River)

Photo: Homalco Cultural Tours
Remote locations and international clientele make the industry particularly vulnerable

Markus Pukonen is currently five years into circumnavigating the globe without using a motorized vehicle. COVID-19 forced him to stop in India. (Photo: Routes of Change)

Photo: Routes of Change
No planes, trains or automobiles here — this adventurer is circling the globe under his own steam

Explorer Mario Rigby at the headquarters of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society and Canadian Geographic in Ottawa during his 2019 cross-Canada cycling expedition. (Photo: Javier Frutos/Can Geo)

Photo: Javier Frutos/Can Geo
Mario Rigby is embarking on a 20 day kayaking expedition to promote domestic and sustainable travel

Women's Dive Day, organized by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors, is July 18. (Photo: Jill Heinerth)

Photo: Jill Heinerth

National Geographic Society President and COO Mike Ulica and Royal Canadian Geographical Society CEO John Geiger meet in Ottawa in November 2019 to discuss the renewed partnership. (Photo: Javier Frutos/Can Geo)

Photo: Javier Frutos
The two iconic geographic societies formalize a renewed partnership

Three of the four members of the British Trans-Arctic Expedition (left to right): Roy 'Fritz' Koerner, glaciologist, Major Ken Hedges, Regimental Medical Officer, seconded from 22 Special Air Service, Allan Gill, navigator. Not pictured: Sir Wally Herbert, expedition leader. (Photo: Mick Rowsell)

Photo: Mick Rowsell
Dr. Ken Hedges, Honourary Colonel and RCGS Fellow, recounts his amazing experience traversing the top of the world on the expedition’s anniversary
Mount Saint Helens viewed from the Johnston Ridge Observatory (C Stenner Photo)

Mount St. Helens as seen from the Johnston Ridge Observatory. The massive crater left behind by the 1980 eruption is the site of numerous ongoing studies. (Photo: Christian Stenner)

Photo: Christian Stenner
On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens exploded in the largest volcanic disaster ever recorded in the United States. Forty years later, work continues to understand the eruption and its aftermath — with some surprising Canadian connections.

Illustration: Kerry Hodgson/Can Geo

Illustration: Kerry Hodgson/Can Geo
A look back at the early years of the 350-year-old institution that once claimed a vast portion of the globe

Illustration: Kerry Hodgson/Can Geo

Illustration: Kerry Hodgson/Can Geo
Une rétrospective des débuts de l’institution fondée il y a 350 ans, qui revendiquait autrefois une part importante du globe
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