About "Environment & Nature"

News about climate change and other environmental issues and the people and organizations behind the science.

Robson Bight Day to Night

This image of B.C.'s Robson Bight was created as part of renowned photographer Stephen Wilkes' Day to Night series by combining hundreds of images taken during a 26-hour period in August 2016. (Photo: Stephen Wilkes)

Photo: Stephen Wilkes
For the latest image in his iconic Day to Night series, photographer Stephen Wilkes set his sights on an important ecological reserve in British Columbia. Here's why. 
Kyle Mac as Don - Courtesy of CBC (Photo Credit: Steve Wilkie)

Kyle Mac as Don the unwitting raccoon whisperer in new CBC comedy series Crawford. (Photo: Steve Wilkie, courtesy CBC)

Photo: Steve Wilkie, courtesy of CBC
In new CBC comedy series Crawford, the ubiquitous backyard bandits get something of an image overhaul 
Aurora borealis light up the night over Waterbury Lake in northern Saskatchewan

Aurora borealis light up the night over Waterbury Lake in northern Saskatchewan. The much-mythologized phenomenon is the only visual evidence we have of the powerful force that helped create our modern world — and could easily bring it down. (Photo: Ezra Meszaros/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Ezra Meszaros/Can Geo Photo Club
In this exclusive excerpt from her new book 'The Spinning Magnet,' Alanna Mitchell explains why we should know and care about Earth's electromagnetic field 
Pascale Marceau and Lonnie Dupre on a previous expedition in Alaska

Pascale Marceau and Lonnie Dupre pictured on a previous expedition in Alaska. The duo hoped to become the first team to summit Canada's third-highest mountain in the winter, but have been forced to aim for a different peak due to weather and terrain conditions. (Photo courtesy Pascale Marceau and Lonnie Dupre)

Photo courtesy Pascale Marceau and Lonnie Dupre
Crevasses and the landing location near Mount Lucania force Lonnie Dupre and Pascale Marceau to set their sights on Mount Steele, Canada’s fifth-highest peak
A film still from Anote's Ark by Matthieu Rytz, an official selection of the World Cinema Documentary Competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival.

A film still from Anote's Ark by Matthieu Rytz, an official selection of the World Cinema Documentary Competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. (Photo: Matthieu Rytz, courtesy of Sundance Institute)

(Photo: Matthieu Rytz, courtesy of Sundance Institute)
New documentary Anote's Ark asks the disturbing question, "What if your country was swallowed by the sea?" 
The articulated tugboat Nathan E. Stewart aground off B.C.'s north coast in October 2016

The articulated tugboat Nathan E. Stewart grounded with fuel barge off Athlone Island on B.C.'s north coast in October 2016. Although the barge itself was empty, when the tug ran aground, it spilled more than 110,000 litres of fuel into into Heiltsuk territorial waters, devastating the local clam fishery. (Photo: Jordan Wilson/Pacific Wild)

Photo: Jordan Wilson/Pacific Wild
As ship traffic increases off the coast of British Columbia, so will accidents. The Heiltsuk Nation intends to be ready.
Golden eagle in flight with the Rockies in the background

Every day in the spring and fall, hundreds of golden eagles stream along the front ranges of the Rocky Mountains on an aerial highway stretching from Alaska to Mexico — but until recently, scientists had no idea the birds migrated at all. (Photo: El McMullin/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: El McMullin/Can Geo Photo Club
No one knew golden eagles in the Yukon and Alaska migrated along the Rockies' front ranges, until an avid birder noticed something strange
Gotsǝ́ mı̨́ “spider web” in sunlight. Photo: Jean Polfus

Gotsǝ́ mı̨́ (Dene meaning “spider net”) in sunlight. (Photo: Jean Polfus)

Photo: Jean Polfus
The spider's web is the perfect metaphor for the interconnections between species, people and place
Arctic, sea ice, Hudson Bay, scientist, environment, climate change

Peter Kattuk (left) and Daniel Qavvik on the lookout for belugas trapped in a polynya near Sanikiluaq, Nunavut. They are part of the Arctic Eider Society's Community-Driven Research Network and a broader collective of hunters, scientists and organizations working to better understand how the Hudson Bay environment is changing. (Photo: Joel Heath/Arctic Eider Society)

Photo: Joel Heath/Arctic Eider Society
Inuit hunters and scientists are collaborating to record recent alarming shifts in Hudson Bay sea ice
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