About "Environment & Nature"

News about climate change and other environmental issues and the people and organizations behind the science.

Scarlet ibises fly above flooded lowlands, near Bom Amigo, Amapá, Brazilian Amazon.

Scarlet ibises fly above flooded lowlands, near Bom Amigo, Amapá, Brazilian Amazon. This image is part of a series, “Amazon: Paradise Threatened,” by American photographer Daniel Beltra exploring the destruction of the world’s largest tropical rainforest. Beltra placed third in the Environment - Stories category of the 2018 World Press Photo Contest. (Photo: Daniel Beltra)

Photo: Daniel Beltra
Tour of winning images to make four Canadian stops, starting July 20 at the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa
Cover of new book ICE, with author photo of Klaus Dodds

In his new book, Klaus Dodds explores not just the physical manifestations of ice, but their deeper meanings. (Author photo courtesy Reaktion Books)

Author photo courtesy Reaktion Books
In his new book, Klaus Dodds delves into the fascinating natural and cultural history of ice
A worker in a flightsuit makes adjustments to a satellite

An engineer at MDA Corporation in Montreal makes adjustments to one of three new satellites that will orbit Earth for seven years as part of the Canadian Space Agency’s newest RADARSAT mission. (Photo: Ossie Michelin/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Ossie Michelin/Canadian Geographic
The newest generation of the successful RADARSAT program will see three small satellites orbit Earth in tandem to provide detailed environmental data to Canadian researchers and government departments
Man walking through landfill with seagulls overhead

According to a UN sustainability report released this month, on average, each Canadian produces 1.9 kilograms of non-recyclable solid waste per day, which ends up in landfills. (Photo: Anastasia Nielsen/Can Geo Photo Club)

Photo: Anastasia Nielsen/Can Geo Photo Club
Canada excels in UN’s global ranking on healthcare and education, but garbage habits lower country’s overall sustainability score
Cape Town cityscape

Cape Town’s “Day Zero” was narrowly averted through drastic cuts in municipal water consumption and last-minute transfers from the agricultural sector, but the city’s troubles aren’t over yet. (Photo: Pixabay. CC BY)

Photo: MartinaH79/Pixabay
Cape Town narrowly avoided ‘Day Zero,’ but that doesn’t mean the city is resilient to future water shortages 
RCGS founder Charles Camsell

Geologist, explorer and RCGS founder Charles Camsell, pictured here in an undated photo, was the first to officially map the Yukon’s Peel River watershed. This summer, Camsell’s great-grandson and great-nephew will retrace part of his journey on the territory’s wild rivers. (Photo: RCGS Archives)

Photo: RCGS Archives
Cousins David McGuffin and Terry Camsell relive their ancestor Charles Camsell’s first formal mapping expedition on the Peel River
The marsh boardwalk through Point Pelee National Park at sunset

Point Pelee National Park is a birder’s dream, a paddler’s paradise, and the perfect place to get up close and personal with nature. (Photo: Zach Baranowski/Canadian Geographic)

Photo: Zach Baranowski/Canadian Geographic
Established in 1918, Canada’s southernmost national park is a haven for wildlife and nature lovers alike
Shining Falls in the boreal forest

Pimachiowin Aki has been recognized by UNESCO for both its natural and cultural significance. (Photo: Pimachiowin Aki Corporation)

Photo: Pimachiowin Aki Corporation
The 29,040-square-kilometre swath of boreal forest on the Manitoba-Ontario border is the first World Heritage Site in Canada to be recognized for both its cultural and natural significance
Two divers scuba diving in a cave in the Bahamas

This image, taken in a cave in the Bahamas, is an example of cave diving in good conditions, says Jill Heinerth. “Nothing like the horrors they are experiencing in Thailand.” (Photo: Jill Heinerth)

Photo: Jill Heinerth
Expert cave diver and RCGS Explorer-in-Residence Jill Heinerth explains the risks and challenges of rescuing a boys’ soccer team trapped in a flooded cave in Thailand
Conor and Kim Mihell in Nunavik

Conor and Kim Mihell on Rivière Guerin in August 2016 during a previous canoe expedition in Nunavik, Que. (Photo: Conor Mihell)

Conor and Kim Mihell in Nunavik
We aim to experience and share the vast, little-publicized wilderness of Nunavik, formerly known as Ungava
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