About "Commemorate Canada"

A series of articles, funded by the Government of Canada, celebrating milestone anniversaries of significance in Canadian history.

 
 
 

Nancy Dicks, mairesse de New Glasgow; Henderson Paris, président du Comité commémoratif Viola; et Alexis MacDonald, directrice des opérations chez MacGillivray Injury and Insurance Law, célèbrent l’achèvement du mur commémoratif Viola Desmond sur Viola's Way à New Glasgow. (Photo : avec la permission de MacGillivray Law)

Photo : avec la permission de MacGillivray Law
Le 8 novembre 1946, Viola Desmond est entrée dans l’histoire au cinéma Roseland. Soixante-quinze ans plus tard, le site poursuit son travail de sensibilisation auprès de la communauté.

New Glasgow Mayor Nancy Dicks, Viola Commemorative Committee chair Henderson Paris and MacGillivray Injury and Insurance Law operations manager Alexis MacDonald celebrate the completion of the Viola Desmond Commemorative Wall on Viola’s Way in New Glasgow, N.S. (Photo courtesy MacGillivray Law)

Photo courtesy MacGillivray Law
On Nov. 8, 1946, Viola Desmond made history at the Roseland Theatre in New Glasgow, N.S. Seventy-five years later, the building’s exterior pays tribute to her life through art.

Les Traités 1 et 2, 1871. (Carte: Chris Brackley/Can Geo; Données sur les postes de traite, les missions et les voies de transport d’après la planche 17, Atlas historique du Canada, vol. 2.)

Carte: Chris Brackley/Can Geo; Données sur les postes de traite, les missions et les voies de transport d’après la planche 17, Atlas historique du Canada, vol. 2.
Cette année marque un siècle et demi depuis que les traités 1 et 2 ont été signés

Painting: William E. deGarthe Nova Scotia Archives Documentary Art Collection: 1896-352 No. 7

Painting: William E. deGarthe Nova Scotia Archives Documentary Art Collection: 1896-352 No. 7
100 years ago — on October 22, 1921 — the iconic Nova Scotian schooner was victorious in its first major race

Female journalists of colour have received a torrent of hate email in the aftermath of the recent federal election, leading the Canadian Association of Journalists to issue a statement condemning what it calls “coordinated campaigns that strive to undermine the freedom of the press.”

Elamin Abdelmahmoud, a pop culture and political commentator with CBC and Buzzfeed, explores the tension between the idea and the practice of multiculturalism in Canada — especially if you are a public figure of colour
Canadian Mosaic Project

Alberta-based photographer Tim Van Horn has been on the road since 2008, visiting more than 1,500 communities around Canada for the Canadian Mosaic project, an exploration of culture and diversity across the country. He has taken more than 85,000 portraits. (Photo: Tim Van Horn)

Photo: Tim Van Horn
Michael Adams, president of the Environics group of companies and the Environics Institute, and a regular contributor of published commentary on Canadian values and social trends, says most Canadians view multiculturalism as an important symbol of what we aspire to as a society
A Japanese Canadian Group Portrait in Front of the Hollow Tree in Stanley Park, Vancouver, 1909

A Japanese Canadian group portrait in front of the Hollow Tree in Stanley Park, Vancouver, 1909. (Photo courtesy of the Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre). MHSO-JAP-201097-654.tif.

Photo courtesy of the Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre
Dora Nipp, CEO of the Multicultural History Society of Ontario, reflects on the importance of chronicling migrant, ethnic and Indigenous stories as an essential means to understanding Canada in the 20th century and beyond

Omar Mouallem’s new book, Praying to the West, explores the unknown history of Islam across the Americas. (Author photo: Aaron Pedersen)

Author photo: Aaron Pedersen
Omar Mouallem, author of Praying to the West: How Muslims Shaped the Americas, looks at why an unshakeable faith in Canada’s multiculturalism project — common amongst the generation of Muslim immigrants who arrived in the ’70s — is not always shared by those who have migrated in the last 20 years, and is rarely felt by their children

A still image from “Can I just call you Sue?”, a short film by Soo Kyung Min exploring the pressure to conform as a new immigrant to Canada. (Image: Soo Kyung Min)

Image: Soo Kyung Min
Professor Anna Triandafyllidou reflects on a digital storytelling project that saw 28 graduate students from across Canada answer the question: Who am I?
Map of treaties 1 and 2

Treaties 1 and 2, 1871. (Map: Chris Brackley/Can Geo; trading post, mission and transportation route data based on Plate 17, Historical Atlas of Canada, Vol. 2)

Map: Chris Brackley/Can Geo; trading post, mission and transportation route data based on Plate 17, Historical Atlas of Canada, Vol. 2
This year marks a century and a half since the first numbered treaties were signed
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