• Artists Hilde Lambrechts, Kirstin Davidson and Kim Lulashnyk standing inside their Compass: Peace in All Directions art installation.

    Artists (left to right) Hilde Lambrechts, Kirstin Davidson and Kim Lulashnyk stand among the ceramic roses, feathers, birds and fleur-de-lis sculptures they created for their art installation Compass: Peace in All Directions, to be decommissioned on Sept. 30. (Photo: The Ottawa Guild of Potters)

This Sunday, the art installation Compass: Peace in All Directions, created by artists Hilde Lambrechts, Kirstin Davidson and Kim Lulashnyk as part of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society’s 2018 Summer Exhibits Series at 50 Sussex in Ottawa, will be decommissioned and visitors will have the opportunity to own a unique part of it.

From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sept. 30, the artists behind Compass will be selling 3,800 hand-crafted sculptures that formed the 15-metre-wide art installation on the front lawn of Canada’s Centre for Geography and Exploration. The one-of-a-kind rose, feather and fleur-de-lis ceramic sculptures and rods are $10 each, while the special edition ceramic birds (only 195 have been created in total — one for every country in the world) will be sold at $20 each.

Compass represents the story of Canada in a nutshell, with each iconic sculpture symbolizing the main groups that inhabited the Ottawa area at the time of Confederation — roses for the British, feathers to represent Indigenous Peoples and fleur-de-lis for the French. The birds represent immigrants to Canada, a crucial part of the country's past, present and future. 

To own an original piece of Canadian art history and to carry on the message of Peace in All Directions, purchase a ticket online at eventbrite.ca, to be redeemed this Sunday when you choose the sculpture that speaks to you. There is no limit to the number of tickets you may purchase.