• Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada

    Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada, speaks at the launch of the Climate Change is Here exhibition at Ottawa's Lansdowne Park on June 5. (Photo: Alexandra Pope/Canadian Geographic)

  • Grant Gilchrist and daughter Caitlin view the Climate Change is Here exhibition

    Grant Gilchrist and daughter Caitlin view the Climate Change is Here exhibition. Gilchrist, an Arctic research scientist, captured one of the images featured in the exhibition. (Photo: Alexandra Pope/Canadian Geographic)

A new outdoor exhibition in the nation’s capital is using the power of the photograph to drive home the global impact of climate change and inspire individual action.

Climate Change is Here, a joint effort between the Canadian Science and Technology Museum’s Let’s Talk Energy program and various federal ministries, is a collection of photographs and maps from National Geographic’s reporting on the subject, mounted on modular frames outside the Horticulture Building in Ottawa’s Lansdowne Park.

The 20 panels — which are illuminated by solar-powered lights — also highlight Canadian research on climate change.

At a launch event for the exhibition on June 5, Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada, praised the Science and Technology Museum for transcending the traditional museum space and said she hopes the photographs will serve as a reminder of the need for action on climate change.

“Through these very powerful images, we can see the impact of climate change and see how Canada is part of the solution,” she said. “Everyone’s in this together and we have to seize the day.”

Alex Benay, CEO of the Science and Technology Museum and its partners, added the exhibition is a welcome addition to the Let’s Talk Energy program, which aims to increase Canadians’ energy literacy.

“We don’t claim to have all the answers [on climate change], but we can promote awareness and discussion on the topic,” he said.

The exhibition, which is free, will be on display until September 6, after which it will become available for national and international tours.