• A member of the intermittent irrigation project team
    A member of the intermittent irrigation project team (left) helps a local farmer conduct a test to measure rice yields near the town of Guadalupe in Northern Peru. (Photo: Esther Montalvan)

When large-scale irrigation came to Peru's northern coast in the 1960s and 1970s, it brought with it an explosion in agriculture — and one of the world's deadliest diseases. Brian Owens examines how changing irrigation practices has helped turn the tide against malaria​. Part of an ongoing series of stories about innovative projects in the developing world​, a partnership between the International Development Research Centre and Canadian Geographic.