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Canada in 1849
1849
eighteen fourty-nine

In 1849, the government of Canada passed the Rebellion Losses Bill that would compensate Lower Canadians for land lost during the Rebellions of 1837. But the bill didn't differentiate between ordinary people and rebels, compensating both. This incited an angry mob in Montréal to burn down the Parliament Buildings. The bill wasn't rescinded, but Parliament was moved, alternating between Quebec City and Toronto until its establishment in Ottawa on the last day of 1857. Although Upper and Lower Canada were united, the Province of Canada was by no means a uniform region. The old Lower Canada retained its own language, civil code and the seigneurial land system. And although it also had almost 40 percent more people than did Upper Canada, there was equal representation for both provinces in the elected legislature. Despite their differences, Upper and Lower Canada developed strong commerce, transportation and political ties. In 1849, the border between Canada and the U.S., which ran along the 49th parallel, was extended to the Pacific.

Boundary Changes

GLOSSARY TERMS

Rebellions of 1837: Series of conflicts in Upper and Lower Canada over discontent with British ruling class.

Parliament Buildings: Today's Parliament Buildings in Ottawa are home to the House of Commons, Senate, offices and committee rooms of parliamentarians. They represent the best example of Gothic revival architecture in Canada. All but the library was rebuilt after a disastrous fire in 1916.

British Columbia: Most westerly and third-largest province in Canada. Named when Queen Victoria was officially proclaimed in 1858.

North-West Territory: Acquired by Canada from the Hudson's Bay Co. on July 15, 1870, along with Rupert's Land.

Stickeen Territory: The Hudson's Bay Co. leased a northern region from the Russian American Fur Co. in the mid-1800s. When gold was found in the Stikine River, the region was taken from HBC and turned into the Stickeen Territory by the British in 1862. Eventually, the region was absorbed into the province of British Columbia.

GLOSSARY TERMS

Rebellions of 1837: Series of conflicts in Upper and Lower Canada over discontent with British ruling class.

Parliament Buildings: Today's Parliament Buildings in Ottawa are home to the House of Commons, Senate, offices and committee rooms of parliamentarians. They represent the best example of Gothic revival architecture in Canada. All but the library was rebuilt after a disastrous fire in 1916.

British Columbia: Most westerly and third-largest province in Canada. Named when Queen Victoria was officially proclaimed in 1858.

North-West Territory: Acquired by Canada from the Hudson's Bay Co. on July 15, 1870, along with Rupert's Land.

Stickeen Territory: The Hudson's Bay Co. leased a northern region from the Russian American Fur Co. in the mid-1800s. When gold was found in the Stikine River, the region was taken from HBC and turned into the Stickeen Territory by the British in 1862. Eventually, the region was absorbed into the province of British Columbia.





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