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Canada in 1791
1791
seventeen ninety-one

The huge influx of Loyalists changed the makeup of Quebec's population. Sir Guy Carleton had argued for re-establishing the Quebec civil code and other France-based rules in Quebec because of the predominantly French population, but now there were also substantial numbers of British colonists. Again, Sir Guy Carleton - who by that time had been made Lord Dorchester - suggested an improvement to the way the area was governed. He divided Quebec into Upper Canada, which would be modeled after British society, and Lower Canada, which would maintain the French language, civil law and religious institutions. Both Canadas would have elected assemblies, an appointed upper house or council, and an executive, much like the British Commons, Lords and Cabinet. Officials hoped the residents of Lower Canada would witness the prosperity of Upper Canada and be inspired to join British-style rule. Instead, Lower Canada prospered on its' own. In 1760 there were 60,000 habitants; by 1784 there were 110,000 and by 1812 they had increased to 330,000.

Boundary Changes

  • 1798 Colony of St. John's Island renamed Prince Edward Island
  • 1809 Labrador coast annexed to Newfoundland
  • 1818 Boundary between Canada and the United States established at the 49th parallel from Lake of the Woods to the Rockies; Oregon Territory created, to be jointly administered by Britain and the U.S.
  • 1820 Colony of Cape Breton annexed to Nova Scotia
  • 1825 Treaty between Britain and Russia defines border between Alaska and British North America

GLOSSARY TERMS

habitants: Those who worked on farms in the seigneurial system.

Prince Edward Island: Canada's seventh and smallest province, named after Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, who then commanded troops in Halifax. Located in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

GLOSSARY TERMS

habitants: Those who worked on farms in the seigneurial system.

Prince Edward Island: Canada's seventh and smallest province, named after Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, who then commanded troops in Halifax. Located in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.





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